Posts Tagged ‘paintings’

Elizabeth Marruffo

Posted by campbell February 12th, 2012


My partner, the incredibly talented artist Elizabeth Marruffo, has just announced her upcoming exhibition at Turner Galleries. The show will be opening on the 13th of April and will feature a collection of new works.

You can see some more preview shots at her website here as well as some small watercolours and samples of the custom frames she had commissioned for the exhibition. It’s going to be totally AMAAAAAZING!

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misty morning

Posted by campbell December 28th, 2010


Wake up sleepy head, time to go for a walk.

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studio sale

Posted by campbell December 6th, 2010


We’ve decided to move out of our Inglewood studio space at the end of the year.

To celebrate (and to make the moving process that much easier) we’re are holding a sale of our works this Sunday from 10am. Original paintings, framed prints, art supplies and various other trinkets will be available. We want to say goodbye to everything, so all works are priced from 5$-$100.

There will be works from myself, Elizabeth Marruffo and James Macneil available.

Come have a browse, with muffins and a cup of tea and pick up a Christmas gift for someone cute (or if you’re selfish, for your own cute self)

date: Dec 11
time: 10-2
address: 126 Crawford Rd, Maylands

Jump aboard the facebook event here.

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the secret

Posted by campbell December 3rd, 2010


I use my son as unpaid child labor to produce my paintings.

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femme

Posted by campbell November 20th, 2010


The wonderful talented Elizabeth Marruffo will be showing works in a group show titled Femme that’s opening at Studio 281 this saturday at 6pm.

She’ll be exhibiting alongside a range of other female artists including Friends of Leon regulars Jodee Knowles and Alex Lekias as well as Carmen Cilliers, Kiri Booth, Annette Allman, Deborah Zibah and Raquel Cavallaro. The above work, “death of the party” will be available for sale, as a well as a few other new pieces that she has been developing.

The exhibition opens tonight from 6pm at 281 Guildford Road, Maylands.

You can see a preview of the works on show here.

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calling the roll

Posted by campbell November 14th, 2010


Character sheet from my current comics project.

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illustration process

Posted by campbell November 2nd, 2010

I thought I’d break down the process that I went through to make the illustration from my previous post.

I have been a big fan of James Gurneys blog, Gurney Journey for a long time. It’s relaxed, creative, super positive and full of amazing advice for visual artists of all types. When I read it, I feel I’m getting the art school education I missed out on when I actually went to art school.

James Gurney created (among other things) the hugely popular illustrated book series Dinotopia

University was fantastic for me, but for an artist with my interests, the visual components were severely lacking. We had very theory heavy classes which were more concerned with concepts than aesthetics. This left me pretty much on my own to work a lot of the technique side of things out.

Anyway, James Gurney offers many step by step insights in to his image making process. A wonderful example is this post here although he touches on these ideas in many of his other posts. His style is very naturalistic and based on super accurate observation of light, colour and how they combine to create form. I am pretty loosey goosey with these ideas. I tend to be more concerned with line creating flat shapes and colouring intuitively.

I thought for this illustration, I’d challenge myself to go through the same (well, at least similar) steps that James goes through when making an image.

The first step was to do sketches, to develop the idea as much as I could without any external assistance. I wound up with these.

I wanted to do an interior shot of the tree house, one of the characters bedrooms with him reclining and reading. I had a pretty clear vision of the emotions I wanted to convey, of comfort and warmth and relaxation. I remember sitting in bed, reading, exploring new worlds through pages and illustrations.

From these illustrations, I then developed a cardboard and clay model of the bedroom. This took a few hours and a little bit of trial and error as I’d never done one before. The materials made it easy to create soft organic shapes, and any imperfections in the molding were welcome as they provided some nice error in design.

After I was happy with the model, I spray painted the whole thing white. James Gurney does this in a number of examples so that observation of shadows and light become obvious. When there is tonal variation in the model itself, it makes it harder to pin point the relative tonal values.

I then played around with lighting the model. I knew I wanted to light it through the window, but this took a while to get right. I knew I was going to have a second light source coming from within the room, but I didn’t really have a way to get that one to work out.

After photographing the work, I did a detailed drawing from it, with the character and props in place. Once finished, I drew a grid over the work so that I could then expand it on to another sheet of paper.

Then I redrew the grid and the work very lightly on to a large piece of thick watercolour paper. I then worked in to it, with the model at hand for reference and the lit photographs beside me. I also had a small model that I’d made of the characters head. Although he is very cartoony, it helps greatly with maintaining the shape of him.

After I was happy with the colour I had laid down, I then worked back in to the piece with coloured pencils to define shapes and give surfaces texture. Then it was done. Unfortunately I don’t have any step by step images of the actual painting/drawing process. I might scan my next illustration step by step so you can see how I work on the page itself.

The model making and photographing was done over a day. This was because of various drying times involved. The actual labour time was much less. The illustration took one full day of work.

Overall the process was fantastically fulfilling and I learnt a lot through it. There are many lighting elements that I would never have anticipated if it had been illustrated straight from my mind. Environmental and character models are something that I plan on investing a lot more time on in the future. I am not so much interested in achieving a level of naturalism that James Gurney does, but it all helps to create a sense of “reality” for the viewer. That they can place themselves in the world that little bit more. Which I guess is the aim of all picture makers.

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treehouse bedroom

Posted by campbell October 30th, 2010


Here’s a new illustration from the comic series I’m working on, Home Time.

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all over

Posted by campbell October 25th, 2010

The New Perth exhibition is finished and this week I am taking down all the works, patching up the gallery and painting over the mural.

I’m pleased with how the show turned out, although, like all exhibitions the things that I wasn’t able to achieve are the ones that stick in my mind. These things are usually best not to talk about as people viewing the work most likely would never guess what they are.

This body of work is one that I’m keen to continue with, I finally feel that I have struck upon a methodology that combines all the ideas that persist with me. Many of my previous exhibitions, while fine in their own right, were a little all over the place in terms of visual cohesion. I’m looking forward to developing the narrative of New Perth, the myths and stories as well as branching out in to dimensional work. Creating costumes and relics from the struggle, false historical documents of what was.

During the run of the exhibition I was surprised at the amount of media response I received. Ric Spencers in depth review was a real highlight as it’s very difficult to get meaningful constructive criticism outside of university. He’s pretty bang on about a lot of my interests and influences as well, even referencing Leon Golub whose work at the Art Gallery of Western Australia was burnt in to my mind a long time ago. Also of note was my mention on Phantasmaphile, one of mine and Liz’ favorite blogs. To be highlighted alongside some of the most amazing contemporary figurative artists is a real treat. Finally my interview with Voice journalist David Bell was great as a chance to provide more context for the work.

I’d like to thank my wonderful partner Elizabeth Marruffo for her constant support of my practice and this project. None of it would be possible without her.

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new perth review

Posted by campbell October 11th, 2010

Ric Spencer reviewed my latest exhibition, New Perth, in the October 8 edition of the West Australian paper. However, the paper was a limited edition run and was only available for sale on one day, so now you’ve all missed out on buying it, and reading it.

Fear not however! I have scanned the article and even typed it out for your reading pleasure.

“Since impressionism’s intoxication with Japanese prints and Gaugauin’s heading off to Polynesia, the pure of the exotic “other” has never really left art. Of course, it’s never really left our subconscious (or travel brochures) since the Europeans set sail for new worlds but today with global imagery a mouse click away, surely desktop travelling is de rigueur and our desires to elope to fables lands have dwindled.

Not so, according to three shows in town now.

What is interesting about Campbell Whyte’s New Perth, Stephen Eastaugh’s A good Day Tonight and Julie Podstolski’s Geisha is that exotic doesn’t necessarily mean pleasant and nor does it mean utopia. Rather is seems that the contemporary exotic is a nostalgia for anything uncorrupted as a counterpoint to apathy and acceptance.

So, in this sense, where does the contemporary exotic exist? Whyte’s great little show at Free Range is a good place to start looking.

After spending some time in San Fracisco and Oaxaca, Mexico, on artist residencies, Whyte has returned to Perth to produce an art of terrific violence, heavily influenced by the political art of South America.

The style and mannerisms in the paintings blend mural and death art, new age and cult symbolism and the stark, pared down vitriol of someone like Leon Golub.

The new mantra in Whyte’s work is a wake-up call for Perth audiences. Like the work of Patrick Doherty, Whyte examines the possibilities of moral meltdown and examines a Perth engaged with fighting for ideals, involved in protest and civil unrest.

Heady stuff but also refreshing in its approach and the technique it’s delivered in.

The six-panelled work at the centre of the back wall dominates the show and indeed is strong enough to be shown on its own, subjugating the wall painting and other installation work.

This multi-panelled piece utilises broken narrative to deliver six separate works, with titles like Feast of the Unicorns, My Eyes Eat Honey and It Keeps You Running as an ode to the exotic other lying in found aweareness and a cause worth fighting for. In Whyte’s work the breaking down of social structure might lead to chaos but also a sense of rebirth.

This is strong figurative work in search of raw emotion.”

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