Archive for the ‘exhibitions’ Category

Legend of Zelda Map Project

Posted by campbell August 28th, 2011

ghost-web
I’ve been working on a series of illustrations based on the Legend of Zelda
which are going to be a part of the Emulator gaming event which is happening in Brisbane next month.

Each illustration will feature one enemy from the overworld on a small plot of land. I’ll then be stitching them all together to form a map of the overworld, it should be pretty cool when it’s all done. So far I’ve done the Octorock, Moblin, Armos, Zora, Tektite and Ghini You can see all of the enemies I’ve illustrated so far right here.

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beauties and beasts

Posted by campbell April 13th, 2011


I’ll have works in an upcoming group show at Elements Gallery. It features painters who all work with animals in their practice. My partner Elizabeth Marruffo will be showing a new series of works, and there will be works by Sharon Dawes and Geoffery Wake.

It opens Thursday the 14th of April at 6.30pm.

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excitebike

Posted by campbell March 3rd, 2011

excitebike web
SOLD.

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ring a ring a rosie

Posted by campbell January 19th, 2011


This was an illustration that I did for the New Perth exhibition but I decided to leave out of the show, I couldn’t quite figure out how to make it work within the installation as a whole. I still quite like it though.
(click to embiggen, the line work is really fine and looks a bit fuzzy at smaller sizes)

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apples and axes

Posted by campbell December 19th, 2010


Here’s a painting that I did for the last Milk Tooth exhibition that was held at free range gallery. It’s a precursor to the New Perth exhibition, I was playing around with the colours, shapes and imagery that was to feature heavily in the show.

The Milk Tooth exhibitions have their origins at Edith Cowan University where I studied. It was customary for the 2nd year fine arts students to host a fund raiser for the 3rd year students graduating exhibition. The thinking was that the 3rd years had enough to worry about without the extra hassle of fund raising, and then, when it was your turn to graduate, the favor would be returned. This fund raiser would take the form of the A4 exhibitions, where each artist would produce a work (or two) on an A4 sized surface and each work would be priced at $100.

Our graduate year kept doing a similar project after leaving university. The exhibitions were titled Milk Tooth, and have been help most years. It’s a fantastic opportunity to keep in touch with people who we studied with and see how their work and lives are progressing.

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studio sale

Posted by campbell December 6th, 2010


We’ve decided to move out of our Inglewood studio space at the end of the year.

To celebrate (and to make the moving process that much easier) we’re are holding a sale of our works this Sunday from 10am. Original paintings, framed prints, art supplies and various other trinkets will be available. We want to say goodbye to everything, so all works are priced from 5$-$100.

There will be works from myself, Elizabeth Marruffo and James Macneil available.

Come have a browse, with muffins and a cup of tea and pick up a Christmas gift for someone cute (or if you’re selfish, for your own cute self)

date: Dec 11
time: 10-2
address: 126 Crawford Rd, Maylands

Jump aboard the facebook event here.

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femme

Posted by campbell November 20th, 2010


The wonderful talented Elizabeth Marruffo will be showing works in a group show titled Femme that’s opening at Studio 281 this saturday at 6pm.

She’ll be exhibiting alongside a range of other female artists including Friends of Leon regulars Jodee Knowles and Alex Lekias as well as Carmen Cilliers, Kiri Booth, Annette Allman, Deborah Zibah and Raquel Cavallaro. The above work, “death of the party” will be available for sale, as a well as a few other new pieces that she has been developing.

The exhibition opens tonight from 6pm at 281 Guildford Road, Maylands.

You can see a preview of the works on show here.

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artist talks

Posted by campbell October 30th, 2010


Last wednesday was the final artist talk at free range gallery, featuring Adrian Baldsing and Dom Trimboli.

I was lucky enough to have attended university with Adrian, so am pretty familiar with his work. He is a multi-discipline artist who draws strongly from architectural forms and the lasting impression that the September 11 attacks have left on our world.

In his talk, he spoke candidly about his latest exhibition at These Days gallery, his working process and how he blends contemporary street art, white wall gallery ideology, terrorism, 60’s/70’s counterculture, Basquiat and the Raft of the Meduesa.

I am less familiar with Dom’s work, he is a recent free range member, architect, lecturer at UWA and assists in the production of many sculptural works produced in Perth. Dom discussed his thoughts on the positioning of good design within lower economic levels, the recent construction of a house from discarded showroom kitchenettes and how technology is encouraging organic forms to reemerge in architecture.

Once again, Liz has done an amazing job of tying together the practices of two of our in house artists.

On an organisational front, the talks went smoothly and were quite easy to pull together, with eager artists and guests offering up their time. Next year, in October we’ll run the talks again and hopefully open it up to a wider range of artists who have exhibited with us during the year and let the public attend.

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artist talks

Posted by campbell October 26th, 2010


Last week we had the super talented Tanya Schultz and Jennifer Catalano talk about their recent works at free range gallery.

Both artists work with found objects from the environment but in very different ways. Jennifer works with dirt from the local wetlands and wilderness to create pastes which she paints with, while Tanya works with consumer items like plastics toys, candy wrappers and glitter. The contrast between the two practices was great, Jennifer discussed the difficulty in finding the kind of “natural” material that she worked with, she really had to hunt for untouched lands and regions, where as Tanya felt overwhelmed by the abundance of plastics and brightly coloured goodsl. My partner Liz did a fantastic job pairing these two artists up.

This Wednesday Adrian Baldsing and Dom Trimboli will be discussing their practices which are both heavily influenced by construction and architecture.

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all over

Posted by campbell October 25th, 2010

The New Perth exhibition is finished and this week I am taking down all the works, patching up the gallery and painting over the mural.

I’m pleased with how the show turned out, although, like all exhibitions the things that I wasn’t able to achieve are the ones that stick in my mind. These things are usually best not to talk about as people viewing the work most likely would never guess what they are.

This body of work is one that I’m keen to continue with, I finally feel that I have struck upon a methodology that combines all the ideas that persist with me. Many of my previous exhibitions, while fine in their own right, were a little all over the place in terms of visual cohesion. I’m looking forward to developing the narrative of New Perth, the myths and stories as well as branching out in to dimensional work. Creating costumes and relics from the struggle, false historical documents of what was.

During the run of the exhibition I was surprised at the amount of media response I received. Ric Spencers in depth review was a real highlight as it’s very difficult to get meaningful constructive criticism outside of university. He’s pretty bang on about a lot of my interests and influences as well, even referencing Leon Golub whose work at the Art Gallery of Western Australia was burnt in to my mind a long time ago. Also of note was my mention on Phantasmaphile, one of mine and Liz’ favorite blogs. To be highlighted alongside some of the most amazing contemporary figurative artists is a real treat. Finally my interview with Voice journalist David Bell was great as a chance to provide more context for the work.

I’d like to thank my wonderful partner Elizabeth Marruffo for her constant support of my practice and this project. None of it would be possible without her.

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